From Febrile Seizures To Vacationing in Eilat, Oxygen Is a Must For Medical First Responders

One Saturday evening, a few months ago, United Hatzalah volunteer EMT Patrick Even-Tzor was winding down after a long day in his home in the city of Holon. Just as he was getting into bed, United Hatzalah’s Dispatch and Command Center alerted him to a medical emergency occurring in the neighboring city of Mazkeret Batya. Despite being still dressed in his pajamas, Patrick threw on a pair of shoes, rushed out to his ambucycle, and raced over to the given address.

Illustration of a boy receiving oxygen

Arriving in 5 minutes along with a fellow ambucycle responder, Patrick found a frantic mother holding her six-month-old baby, who was lying limp in her arms. The father explained to Patrick that the little baby had suddenly experienced an intense convulsion. Finding him burning up with fever, the EMTs removed extra layers of clothing and cooled him with a damp cloth.

Simultaneously, the duo provided supplemental oxygen to assist the baby’s labored breathing and help him to regain consciousness. Patrick then took the baby’s vital signs and monitored him as they continued reassuring the distraught family. The EMTs assured the parents that febrile convulsions are relatively common and that the baby’s condition was stable and improving, thanks to the oxygen and damp cloth.

After a few minutes, the baby slowly started returning to himself. He was then transferred to an arriving United Hatzalah ambulance and taken to the hospital for further observation. The mother began to thank the two volunteers and ask how much everything cost. The woman was shocked when she was told that the service is free of charge.

“The oxygen tank that I carry with me is a must-have for every medical first responder, it’s truly a miracle worker,” Patrick commented. “Wherever I go, whether it’s work or even a vacation to Eilat, I have my oxygen on me at all times. Without it, people who experience low oxygen, resulting in fainting and losing consciousness, wouldn’t be able to recover. With such a tool and the proper training, saving lives becomes more easy and frequent.”

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